Restorative

Implants

A dental implant is a post made of metal that is designed to replace missing teeth. It is usually made out of titanium and is placed surgically into the jawbone where the tooth is missing. Unlike a bridge, an implant is a more permanent solution.
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You have several options when replacing teeth; it isn't limited to crowns and conventional bridges or dentures. Dental implants are aesthetically pleasing and feel very natural. Implants are surgically placed below the gums. With time, they fuse to the jawbone and serve as a base for individual replacement teeth, bridges or dentures.

Through a process called osseointegration, implants offer stability because they fuse to your bone. Integration of the implants into your jaw also helps your replacement teeth feel more natural. Some patients have reported that the secure fit is more comfortable than alternatives. Dental implant candidates must have healthy gums and bone to support the implant.

Reasons for Dental Implants

•  Keep the look and feel of a real tooth where one is missing
•  Maintain healthy bone levels
•  Very durable, nearly undetectable, and closest restoration to real teeth
•  Prevent associated jaw joint issues
•  Prevent teeth from shifting to fill gaps
•  Improve bite and chewing ability
•  Help support overdentures
•  Improve aesthetic appearance


What Does a Dental Implant Involve?

•  Implant Site Preparation: To prepare the site, the gum tissue is opened to expose the bone area. If there is insufficient bone structure, bone grafting may be recommended. With healthy bone, a special drill is used to prepare the bone to receive the implant.

•  Placing the Implant: The implant is placed into the healthy bone and the tissue is sutured. The sutures are removed in seven to ten days. It is normal to expect three to six months to heal entirely. Osseointegration occurs over this time period allowing the implant to become part of the upper or lower jaw.

•  Attaching the Post: A special post is attached to the implant when the gum tissue is ready. This post is the support for the new porcelain crown. Zirconium abutments attached to the implant post assure that the new porcelain tooth has translucency properties similar to a natural tooth.

•  Placing the Crown: The new crown is made from impressions taken and shaded to match your existing teeth. The crown is cemented over the post. The final prosthetic crown appears as your natural tooth.

Smoking tends to lead to a high rate of failure in implants, so dental implants are not the best option for patients who are actively smoking. We will help you determine whether dental implants will be a good tooth replacement option for you. Proper brushing and flossing will maximize the longevity of your new dental implant.

Dental Bridges

A dental bridge is a fixed (non-removable) appliance and is one of the traditional dental methods for replacing missing teeth.
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The type of bridge used most often is called a fixed bridge, and consists of two crowns that go over two anchoring teeth (abutment teeth) and are attached on either side of the artificial teeth (pontics), filling the gap created by one or more missing teeth.

A fixed bridge can also be anchored by two or more dental implants.

Dental bridges are highly durable and will last many years with proper home care; however, they may need to be replaced or re-cemented due to normal wear.

Reasons for a Fixed Bridge

•  Fill the space left by missing teeth
•  Maintain facial shape
•  Prevent remaining teeth from drifting out of position
•  Restore chewing and speaking ability
•  Restore your smile
•  Upgrade from a removable partial denture to a permanent dental appliance

What Does a Fixed Bridge Involve?

Getting a bridge usually requires two or more visits. While the teeth are numb, the two anchoring teeth are prepared by removing a portion of enamel to allow for a crown. Next, a highly accurate impression (mold) is made which will be sent to a dental laboratory where the bridge will be fabricated. In addition, a temporary bridge will be made and worn for several weeks until your next appointment.

At the second visit, your bridge will be carefully checked, adjusted and cemented to achieve a proper fit and comfortable bite.

You will receive care instructions at the conclusion of your treatment. Proper brushing, flossing, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new bridge.

Replacing Teeth With Dentures

Dentures are a "replacement" option for missing teeth. There are two variations of dentures: partial dentures and full dentures. The difference between the two lies in how many natural teeth remain.
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When the condition of the teeth has deteriorated so far that they can no longer be repaired, removal is the only option.

A complete denture is a removable prosthesis of white plastic teeth in a pink gum-colored plastic base; the denture rests on the remaining gum ridge once all of the teeth in the arch have been removed.

It is important to note that life with an upper and/or lower denture is a major lifestyle change when compared to natural teeth. Dentures impact the type of food you are able to eat and taste, your self-confidence in social situations, and sometimes even your self-esteem.

Reasons for a Full Denture

•  All teeth missing in the same arch
•  Restore chewing ability
•  Restore a natural looking smile
•  Traditional dentures can be an economical alternative to other procedures

An upper full denture will almost always feel better than a lower full denture. In order to dramatically improve the fit of a lower full denture, we frequently suggest using dental implants as a retentive mechanism. Dental implants placed in the lower jaw can help anchor the denture and significantly improve comfort. Sometimes, the implants can even be placed in the jaw after a denture has been in use for several years.

Tooth Extractions

A tooth extraction is the procedure done to remove a tooth that is damaged beyond repair from its socket in the jawbone. Extractions are also done to remove wisdom teeth that may be impacted or create future problems.
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Many extractions can be performed in our Sacramento office; however, more complicated procedures may be referred to one of our trusted oral surgeons.

Why Are Teeth Extracted?

•  Severely decayed teeth
•  Periodontal disease leading to bone loss
•  Fractured in such a way that it is impossible or impractical to repair
•  Badly positioned (impacted wisdom teeth)
•  Non-functional or poorly functional teeth that should be replaced with a bridge, denture or dental implant

Extractions are generally classified as either non-surgical (also known as "simple") or surgical (involving cutting through the gums and tooth). A simple procedure can quickly become a surgical procedure if the tooth fractures or refuses to loosen under pressure. We perform these procedures only after making the extraction site(s) profoundly numb.

Tooth Extraction Post-Operative Instructions

Following tooth extraction you may experience bleeding, oozing, soreness or moderate to severe pain.

Bleeding should stop by 8-12 hours following the extraction. If you experience significant bleeding past this time please call our office immediately, (916) 481-5935. Oozing of pink fluid for 1-2 days is normal.

Discomfort following the tooth extraction is best managed with a mild analgesic like Tylenol, Advil or Aleve. If you experience severe pain that lasts more than 2-3 days after your extraction please call our office at (916) 481-5935.

Healing should be as smooth as possible following tooth extraction. It is important to not disturb the extraction site. Remember to eat a soft diet and avoid vigorous rinsing for 24 hours following the extraction.

After 24 hours rinse with strong warm salt water for 1 minute a couple of times daily for 3-4 days. This will reduce the number of bacteria in your mouth and will promote better healing.

If you have any further questions, please feel free to call us at (916) 481-5935.

Inlays and Onlays

Inlays and onlays are used to restore portions of the tooth, or to strengthen a tooth. They are alternatives to using fillings or a crown to restore the integrity of the tooth.
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Inlays

When there is only partial damage to your tooth, an inlay can be bonded inside the remaining tooth structure. Traditionally, gold is the material of choice for this type of restoration, and although this is available, most of our dental patients prefer the more natural look that ceramic provides.

Onlays

Onlays are used to restore a portion of the biting cusp of a tooth or to restore the strength of a tooth. Instead of removing healthy tooth structure for a crown placement, an onlay can be used as a more conservative restoration.

Sometimes onlays are referred to as "inside crowns." That is a good description, as it describes the strengthening process that an onlay creates for the tooth. At William Robison DDS, we prefer to do onlays when possible to lessen the amount of healthy tooth removed, compared to traditional crowns. Research has shown that the less you reduce a tooth, the better it will survive long-term, and our goal is to provide you with healthy teeth for life.



LOCATION
William Robison, DDS
Family Dental
1734 Professional Drive
Sacramento, CA 95825-2105

CONTACT
Phone: (916) 481-5935

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